NEW VALLEY 303
Open For Business

 

SACRAMENTO IS WORKING TO SHAKE OFF AN OLD IMAGE.

 

[MARK CULPEPPER, SunEdison]

for people who drive in the 80 corridor it's just like blasting through and you're like, it's primarily farmland, you know, i don't want to be out here

 

 

BUT THAT’S A PICTURE OF THE PAST. SACRAMENTO IS GROWING UP…

AND BUSINESSES ARE TAKING NOTE.

 

 

[BARBARA HAYES, SACTO]

we’re not small time anymore, by any shape of the imagination, and the outside world is starting to see us as a player.

 

 

AND LOCAL ENTREPRENEURS ARE REALIZING THEY DON’T HAVE TO LEAVE HERE TO PURSUE THEIR GOOD IDEAS.

 

 

[JIM SCRAITH, ANGEL INVESTOR]

what you need to start companies are you need somebody with the idea, you need somebody with the money and you need experience to put around that the area really has all of that now.

 

 

 

IN THIS EDITION OF NEW VALLEY, WE’LL TAKE A LOOK HOW THE SACRAMENTO REGION IS WORKING TO BECOME THE BEST PLACE TO DO BUSINESS.

 

[music]

 

 

 

New Valley is brought to you by the following sponsors:

 

Williams + Paddon: architects, planners, people. Providing architecture, planning, and interior design for corporate, institutional, and educational clients. Design services for a sustainable future.

 

VSP is a proud leader of Partnership for Prosperity, working together to create a shared regional business agenda that enriches our quality of life.

 

Five Star Bank is a full-service commercial bank headquartered in the Capitol region. Five Star Bank specializes in serving the needs of the local real estate community and business owners of the Central Valley. Five Star Bank is proud to serve the community and support public television.

 

Treasure Homes is proud to support New Valley in an effort to build better communities and encourage smarter business practices. Fallen Leaf at River Bend in Natomas is an example of Treasure Homes’ commitment to building energy efficient homes that promote clean energy and enhance the quality of life throughout the Sacramento region.

 

[music]

WHAT DO YOU SEE WHEN YOU THINK OF SACRAMENTO –

 

A VIBRANT MIDTOWN?

SUBURBAN STRIP MALLS?

FREEWAYS?

RIVERS?

THE CAPITAL?

TRAFFIC?

FARMLAND?

 

AS A REGION, IT’S HARD TO PIN DOWN AN IMAGE.

 

 

Barbara Hayes, SACTO

 

we’re working to craft a regional identity. What are we? what do we want to be when we grow up?

 

 

CREATING A SINGLE IDENTITY FOR A DIVERSE REGION ENCOMPASSING SIX COUNTIES IS NOT EASY …

 

BUT LOCAL LEADERS WORKING ON A NEW ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY SAY IT’S ESSENTIAL FOR ATTRACTING BUSINESSES.

 

 

[Hayes]

You know businesses, when they’re looking at a location or looking for a place to expand, they don’t identify individual cities; they look at regions, because short of who picks up their garbage or who they pay their water bill to, everything else is regional

 

 

REGIONAL ISSUES SUCH AS TRANSPORTATION, HOUSING, AIR QUALITY… AND THE NUMBER ONE CONCERN OF ANY NEW BUSINESS – WORKFORCE.

 

WHILE LOCAL PLANNERS ARE ADDRESSING CONCERNS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYERS FOR THE REGION…. THEY’RE ALSO TRYING TO COME UP WITH AN IDENTITY THAT SETS THE REGION APART.

 

 

…whether it’s embracing clean energy, or education or being best place to do business….

 

BEYOND THE IMAGE CAMPAIGN,

REGIONAL PLANNERS ARE ADOPTING NEW STRATEGIES IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT.

 

INCLUDING A FOCUS ON FOSTERING THE AREA’S SMALLER BUSINESSES.

 

BECAUSE WHILE ATTRACTING LARGE CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS IS DESIRABLE, MOST OF THE REGION’S GROWTH IS IN SMALL-TO- MEDIUM SIZED COMPANIES …

THOSE LIKE ROSEVILLE’S SIERRA LOGIC.

 

Bob Whitson, Sierra Logic/ Emulex

ever since we started our company and got our first round of funding, the region has been unbelievably supportive and has nurtured us.

 

PROVIDING THAT TYPE OF SUPPORT PAYS OFF FOR THE LOCAL ECONOMY.

 

IT HELPED SIERRA LOGIC GROW FROM FOUR TO 70 EMPLOYEES OVER THE PAST FIVE YEARS.

 

“this is one of the quick signs you put up when you get acquired …”

 

AND LAST YEAR, SIERRA LOGIC WAS ACQUIRED BY EMULEX CORPORATION IN A 180-MILLION DOLLAR CASH DEAL.

 

BOB WHITSON

so we are a much stronger, much larger organization than we were before and we're still growing... we're going to grow between 10-20% ... over next five years. you'll see that growth in this region

 

 

THE ACQUISITION COMPLETES A PERFECT BUSINESS CYCLE.

 

 

how are our expenses this month?...

 

SIERRA LOGIC STARTED AS A SPIN-OFF COMPANY FROM HEWLETT PACKARD AND AGILENT WHERE BOB AND HIS PARTNERS WORKED TOGETHER.

 

AND NOW THAT THEIR COMPANY HAS BECOME PART OF A LARGER CORPORATION, HE EXPECTS IT WILL SPIN OUT NEW ENTREPRENEURS.

 

BOB WHITSON

it's kind of like building an infrastructure- a start up infrastructure so, whatever we can do to help other starts ups succeed , we will do.

 

 

THAT INFRASTRUCTURE IS GROWING IN SACRAMENTO -- AS MORE START-UPS ARE SPINNING OUT OF LARGER BUSINESSES – AS WELL AS THE LOCAL UNIVERSITIES- PARTICULARLY UC DAVIS.

 

do you have that printed out…

 

BRIAN HOBLIT, BEN MOK, AND JORGE CAMPOS STARTED THEIR HIGH TECH BUSINESS -CALLED MUTANT LOGIC - IN A CLASS AT THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS.

 

Brian Hoblitt, CFO, Mutant Logic

 

For me, it started out totally as a school project ..i wanted to learn to write a business plan… I wanted to learn how to run a business, but I didn’t think it was actually going to turn into a business

 

 

THEIRS IS NOT A TYPICAL STORY, BUT IT IS HAPPENING MORE OFTEN IN CLASSES LIKE THIS, WHICH ARE PART OF THE UNIVERSITY’S CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP.

 

ANDREW Hargadon, UC Davis, center for entrepreneurship

 

what we got here are a number of doctoral students in the life sciences , computer sciences, engineering – they’ve come over to the business school campus to work alongside MBAs in putting a profitable biz around a research idea.

 

BEN AND BRIAN, WHO ARE STILL IN THE MBA PROGRAM, TEAMED UP WITH JORGE TO HELP DEVELOP A BUSINESS AROUND HIS PhD RESEARCH -- WHICH PROVIDES A NEW SOLUTION TO THE OLD PROBLEM OF VERIFYING CHIP DESIGNS FOR HIGH TECH COMPANIES.

 

 

our flagship product is a mutation based…

 

AND IT WAS AT A SCHOOL BUSINESS PLAN COMPETITION THAT THE MUTANT LOGIC TEAM CAUGHT THE ATTENTION OF ANGEL INVESTOR JIM SCHRAITH.

[applause]

JIM SCHRAITH, ANGEL INVESTOR

 

I wrote them a check, right up front I gave them really their first seed funding

 

 

AND SINCE JIM NOW HAS A STAKE IN SEEING THIS TEAM SUCCEED, HE ALSO SET THEM UP WITH AN OFFICE AT HIS BUSINESS INCUBATOR IN EL DORADO HILLS.

 

AND, PERHAPS MOST IMPORTANTLY, HE STARTED INTRODUCING THEM TO PEOPLE.

 

Jim Schraith

while they had a tremendous idea, great technology and absolute tremendous amount of energy, what they lacked was a lot of real life business experience

 

 

SO JIM INTRODUCED THEM TO BOB BENNET, AN EXPERIENCED TECH ENTREPRENEUR, WHO BECAME THE NEW C-E-O OF MUTANT LOGIC.

 

 

Jorge: it's a natural step actually it just shows how we are growing…

Brian : i think in a way, we know what we don't know and we know that to get to the size of this company that we want it to be, we don't have the managerial experience to get there.

 

 

THE TYPE OF SYNERGIES IT TAKES FOR A MUTANT LOGIC TO EMERGE – ARE NEW TO SACRAMENTO.

 

ONLY FIVE YEARS AGO, START UP BUSINESSES HAD TO GO OUTSIDE THE AREA TO FIND INVESTORS.

 

 

 

UC DAVIS ONLY RECENTLY STARTED OFFERING THESE PROGRAMS FOCUSED ON ENTREPRENEURSHIP.

 

AND THE REGION’S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT EFFORTS ARE JUST NOW TURNING THEIR ATTENTION TO MAKING SURE THESE SMALL COMPANIES SUCCEED.

 

 

that’s it, thanks everyone.

 

BARBARA Hayes, SACTO

the region is at the point of economic maturation now where we can support these companies.

that with the correct support, can become the next Hewlett Packard, or Genentech or you know, companies that define a region

 

I’m wrestling with the look and feel…

 

 

WHICH GETS US BACK TO THAT IMAGE QUESTION.

 

WHAT DOES SACRAMENTO WANT TO BE WHEN IT GROWS UP?

 

 

WE TALKED TO SOME OF THE PEOPLE WHO LIVE AND WORK HERE --AND ASKED THEM WHAT THEY THINK SACRAMENTO SHOULD BE KNOWN FOR.

 

 

[ MOS IN GRAPHIC BOX]

 

[Ian Johnson]

i think we should embrace the fact that we are kind of a smaller town, but we have everything that a big town has.

 

[Glenn Destatte]

i think they should be known for fighting sprawl instead of embacing it.

 

[Andrew Hargadon]

I think the Sacramento region’s identity right now is really strong in energy and really strong in environment.

 

 

[Nicole Disson]

This city is in such a great location to the bay area and to Napa and Sonoma and you know different parts surrounding

 

[Jim Scraith]

It really is close to all the things that are fun to do – without the hassle.

 

[Aviva Palmer]

i think sac should be known for having a small funky downtown with a good art scene and good music scene

 

[Liz Beidelman]

The Sacramento region is centrally located, that it’s, you know, you have access to the Bay Area, the Silicon Valley. You have mountains, you’ve got the ocean

we’re close to many things and we’re in California. That’s cool.

 

 

[Music]

 

MIKE ZEIGLER, CEO, PRIDE Industries

 

This is a great place and I know that we struggle with regional identity. I don't struggle with it at all. I come from the Sacramento region, I love being here. This is just an incredible place to do business

 

 

MIKE ZEIGLER IS THE PRESIDENT OF PRIDE INDUSTRIES – AND ONE OF THE REGION’S BIGGEST CHEERLEADERS WHEN IT COMES TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT.

 

MIKE ZEIGLER

 

This community has fostered and helped us become the largest employer of people with disabilities in America --

What other community can say that?

 

PRIDE IS ALSO ONE OF THE LARGEST EMPLOYERS OVERALL IN THE SACRAMENTO REGION.

 

MORE THAN TWO-THIRDS OF THESE EMPLOYEES ARE DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED.

 

 

 

 

IT’S A SUCCESS STORY THAT SEEMS TO DEFY ALL ODDS.

 

PRIDE INDUSTRIES STARTED IN A CHURCH BASEMENT FORTY YEARS AGO BY A GROUP OF PARENTS LOOKING FOR A WAY TO HELP THEIR CHILDREN BECOME EMPLOYED. A NON-PROFIT, IT WAS ALMOST ENTIRELY SUPPORTED BY GOVERNMENT FUNDS.

 

MIKE ZEIGLER

If you fast forward to today, we have about $100 million in sales, 3200 employees part time and full time, 2500 of our employees are people with disabilities

 

 

PEOPLE THAT ARE GENERALLY CONSIDERED UNEMPLOYABLE.

 

RANDY, PRIDE EMPLOYEE

You go through a lot of things when you are disabled and on social security - people look at you like you can't work

 

 

PRIDE SHATTERS THAT PERCEPTION EVERY DAY…

 

TRAINING AND EMPLOYING PEOPLE LIKE RANDY – AND OTHERS WITH A WIDE RANGE OF DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES – TO PROVIDE SERVICES TO BIG NAME CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT CLIENTS.

 

 

 

IF YOU ORDER A COMPUTER COMPONENT FROM HEWLETT PACKARD, CHANCES ARE IT WAS SHIPPED FROM HERE.

 

THERE’S ELECTRONICS MANUFACTURING AND PRODUCT ASSEMBLY …

 

AND SERVICES RANGING FROM GLOBAL LOGISTICS TO RECYCLING.

 

ELISABETH BRINTON, VP Sales & Mkting

 

Pride competes in the open marketplace like any business and we have to meet, you know, best price, value, quality, all of the same metrics that any business would do.

 

 

PRIDE NOW EXTENDS FAR BEYOND CALIFORNIA, WITH OPERATIONS IN SEVERAL STATES.

 

IT’S STILL TECHNICALLY A NON-PROFIT – OR WHAT THEY CALL A BREAK EVEN CORPORATION.

 

ALL OF THE PROFITS ARE PUT BACK INTO THE BUSINESS TO PROVIDE A FULL SPECTRUM OF SERVICES TO HELP THESE EMPLOYEES SUCCEED.

 

THAT INCLUDES COUNSELORS WHO ARE ASSIGNED TO EVERY EMPLOYEE.

 

 

ELISABETH BRINTON

 

we do very careful matching of what the right career path would be them so they can grow and they can learn and have the training and advancement that any of us value. And the same time we’re matching them strategically to the right business opportunity for what our customers need.

 

THE SUCCESS OF THIS APPROACH IS NOT ONLY APPARENT IN THE GROWTH OF THE COMPANY, BUT IN THE GROWTH OF EACH EMPLOYEE.

 

RANDY

 

that’s been one of the longest jobs i ever had. i never worked 18 consecutive months like now - i'm always on the job for a month or two and i'm out, know what i mean?

 

 

 

Pride gave me a lot of work experience and also how to deal with my work habits. learning how to cope with things and come to work

 

THE PRIDE MANTRA IS “NO MONEY, NO MISSION” -- IN ORDER TO ACHIEVE THEIR MISSION OF CREATING JOBS FOR THE DISABLED, THEY MUST RUN A SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS.

 

THEY DO THIS WITH PRACTICES THAT SEEM ALMOST ANTITHETICAL TO TYPICAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT.

 

 

WHILE MOST BUSINESSES ARE LOOKING FOR WAYS TO STREAMLINE, PRIDE ACTUALLY LOOKS FOR STRATEGIC WAYS TO CREATE MORE JOBS.

 

BUT WITH MORE THAN 100- MILLION DOLLARS IN REVENUE LAST YEAR, NO ONE WOULD ARGUE IT ISN’T WORKING.

 

ELISABETH BRINTON

 

Well the key is that it does work and it requires a lot of creativity and a tremendous amount of passion.

 

 

 

 

AND THAT, SAYS MIKE ZEIGLER, IS THEIR SECRET WEAPON – PASSION FOR WHAT THEY DO AND THE LIVES THEY ARE CHANGING.

 

MIKE ZEIGLER

our measure of success is if somebody's life changes for the better. Somebody who didn't used to earn a living, earns a living. Somebody who used to be on welfare, gets off of welfare. Somebody who used to take money from tax payers becomes a tax payer. That's what I get to do. That's pretty amazing if you think about it.

 

 

[Music]

 

 

WHEN IT COMES TO WORKFORCE, THE SACRAMENTO REGION HAS NO SHORTAGE OF PEOPLE … BUT MAKING SURE THEIR SKILLS FIT THE TYPES OF BUSINESSES LOCATING HERE IS A TOP PRIORITY FOR REGIONAL PLANNERS.

 

BARBARA HAYES, SACTO

nine times out of ten, the first question that a company asks us when they’re looking at the region is the demographics of the region, the educational level, what the workforce is comprised of.

 

 

THE AREA HAS PLENTY OF TOP-NOTCH SCHOOLS – INCLUDING ONE OF THE LARGEST COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICTS IN THE STATE.

 

BUT ONLY RECENTLY HAVE THEY ALL BEGUN COORDINATING THEIR PROGRAMS TO SUIT THE NEEDS OF THE LOCAL ECONOMY.

 

BARBARA HAYES

They’re all working together to help their students matriculate through the various systems and come out at the other end with skills and knowledge that will apply to jobs.

 

 

 

 

JOBS IN KEY AREAS SUCH AS HEALTH CARE, WHICH ACCOUNTS FOR FOUR OF THE REGION’S SIX TOP EMPLOYERS.

THE CITY OF ROSEVILLE IS WORKING WITH LOCAL COLLEGES TO MEET THE DEMANDS OF TWO OF ITS LARGEST BUSINESSES.

 

 

JULIA BURROWS

there’s a critical nursing shortage. We have shortages of radiology technicians. Roseville’s blessed to have Sutter and Kaiser doing multi-million dollar expansions. And so they’ve teamed up with the community colleges and Sac State to educate that healthcare work force of the future.

 

 

 

 

HEALTHCARE IS SUCH BIG BUSINESS, IT IS MAKING ITS WAY INTO HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUMS.

 

THE SACRAMENTO PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICT HAS ACTUALLY CREATED AN ENTIRE HIGH SCHOOL DEDICATED TO PREPARING STUDENTS FOR HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONS.

 

MATT PERRY, PRINCIPAL, Health Professions High School:

 

We integrate healthcare into every class. So whether it is PE class or chemistry class or your Spanish class, math class… even in the English courses, healthcare themes are integrated throughout.

 

 

THE REGION’S TECHNOLOGY BUSINESSES WOULD LIKE TO SEE THE SAME THING HAPPENING IN MATH AND SCIENCE TO HELP PREPARE STUDENTS FOR CAREERS IN ENGINEERING.

 

BOB WHITSON, EMULEX

we're seeing a distressing trend in the number of engineers graduating from college and if you trace it back, it’s the number of high school students taking advanced placement math and science classes.

 

 

EMULEX’S BOB WHITSON SAYS THERE IS SUCH A SHORTAGE OF QUALIFIED ENGINEERS IN THIS COUNTRY THAT HE HIRES NEARLY 40% OF HIS EMPLOYEES FROM INDIA.

 

 

 

BUT ACADEMIC PROGRAMS ALONE CANNOT MEET THE WORKFORCE NEEDS IN SACRAMENTO.

 

CALIFORNIA IS FACING A SKILLED LABOR SHORTAGE DUE TO A DEARTH OF VOCATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMS-- TO TRAIN PEOPLE IN FIELDS SUCH AS CONSTRUCTION, MANUFACTURING, AUTOMOTIVE … AND FOOD SERVICE.

 

CHRIS BECKER, KITCHEN ACADEMY

All the culinary schools in the country, producing all the graduates at capacity that they are capable of producing could not fill all food service jobs available.

 

 

CHRIS BECKER HAS BEEN WATCHING SACRAMENTO GROW – AND SAYS THE PROLIFERATION OF HOTELS, RESTAURANTS, AND RETAIL BUSINESSES MAKE THIS A PERFECT LOCATION FOR A NEW BRANCH OF THE KITCHEN ACADEMY.

 

 

THIS 20-THOUSAND SQUARE FOOT SPACE ON DEL PASO ROAD WILL SOON HOUSE THE CULINARY SCHOOL’S CUSTOM TEACHING KITCHENS.

 

IT’S A FAST PACED 30-WEEK PROGRAM DESIGNED TO GET STUDENTS OUT AND INTO JOBS.

 

BECKER

we really don't talk about education, frankly, we train people - we're a point a to point b process. They’re here to do one thing- to learn how to cook .

 

AND AS FAR AS BECKER IS CONCERNED, THE NEW SCHOOL COULD NOT BE BETTER SITUATED GEOGRAPHICALLY.

 

BECKER

we're close to agriculture here, we're close to the wine region here... you could not position a culinary school better. you are close to everything that makes the world of food exciting… because all the good stuff is right here.

 

 

[Music]

 

 

POSITIONING IS KEY WHEN IT COMES TO ATTRACTING NEW BUSINESSES. ONE SECTOR THE SACRAMENTO REGION SEEMS PARTICULARLY WELL SUITED FOR IS CLEAN ENERGY.

 

MARK CULPEPPER, SUNEDISON

 

every day people walk out their front door, look up and say ‘gosh it's bright out here’ and put their sunglasses on and scratch their head and say, so where are we going to get our energy… (laughs)... you know? 04:18

 

 

NATURAL RESOURCES SUCH AS THE CENTRAL VALLEY’S ABUNDANT SUN HAVE LEAD TO THE REGION BEING CALLED THE SAUDI ARABIA OF SOLAR ENERGY.

 

DELTA WINDS ARE ANOTHER PRICELESS RESOURCE FUELING CLEAN ENERGY.

 

EVEN AGRICULTURAL WASTE IS A RESOURCE IN THIS NEW INDUSTRY.

 

MARK CULPEPPER

we're surrounded by energy and it's just ours to take and to make into our new future.

 

 

 

MARK CULPEPPER WORKS FOR SUN-EDISON, THE LARGEST COMMERICIAL SOLAR CONTRACTOR IN THE COUNTRY.

 

BUT JUST SIX MONTHS AGO, IT WAS TEAM SOLAR, A LOCAL HOME-GROWN BUSINESS STARTED BY ANGELA AND RICK LAVEZZO.

 

 

ANGELA LAVEZZO

There was like myself, my husband and two other employees…

we were a Mom and Pop business…

 

 

A MOM AND POP BUSINESS THAT HAD THE FORESIGHT TO JUMP INTO AN INDUSTRY ON THE VERGE OF TAKING OFF.

 

THEIR SOLAR INSTALLATION BUSINESS WAS HELPED ALONG BY STATE AND LOCAL INCENTIVE PROGRAMS TO ENCOURAGE MORE SOLAR ROOFTOPS.

 

BUT SUPPORT FROM THE SACRAMENTO MUNICIPLE UTILITY DISTRICT –SMUD–PERHAPS MADE THE BIGGEST DIFFERENCE.

ANGELA LAVEZZO

SMUD was very instrumental with our growth and we owe a lot to SMUD.

You have people that are there to help and to foster and it really does help you gain exposure and opens doors that you really wouldn't have otherwise have on it.

 

 

 

TEAM SOLAR GREW FROM THREE PEOPLE WORKING PRIMARILY ON SMUD CONTRACTS -- TO THIRTY PEOPLE INSTALLING LARGE SCALE RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL SYSTEMS IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA.

 

BUT THEY KNEW MORE CHANGE WAS ON THE HORIZON IN THE SOLAR INDUSTRY, WHICH WOULD REQUIRE EVEN MORE GROWTH.

 

ANGELA LAVEZZO

rick and i realized early on, we were almost at the point where we had taken this company as far as we were able to grow. We could have maintained and kept same growth level but we were in the process of taking a look at ok, what does it take for you to go to the next level on you own

 

THE NEXT LEVEL CAME WITH THE MERGER AND ACQUISITION OFFER BY SUNEDISON.

 

IT ALLOWED THE LAVEZZOS TO EXPAND THE BUSINESS AND TAP INTO A PIPELINE OF LARGE COMMERCIAL INSTALLATIONS. AND IT GAVE SUNEDISON READY ACCESS TO THE MOST ACTIVE SOLAR MARKET IN THE COUNTRY.

 

 

 

A NUMBER OF NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL SOLAR COMPANIES HAVE THEIR SIGHTS SET ON SACRAMENTO.

 

IT’S NOT JUST THE SUN THAT DRAWS THEM.

 

 

 

CALIFORNIA LEADS THE COUNTRY IN CLEAN ENERGY INDUSTRIES – AND MANY COMPANIES WANT TO BE CLOSE TO WHERE THE DECISIONS ARE MADE.

 

BARBARA HAYES

there are so many new initiatives coming out of the state around clean energy and green technology that companies want to locate here to be able to impact that, the formation of those initiatives and the new laws.

 

NEIL KOEHLER, PACIFIC ETHANOL

what sacramento brings to us is the center of both the political and agricultural leadership in california

 

 

PACIFIC ETHANOL, WHICH IS BUILDING PLANTS ACROSS THE WEST INCLUDING ONE IN THE CENTRAL VALLEY TOWN OF MADERA, IS OPENING ITS NEW HEADQUARTERS ON CAPITAL MALL.

 

BUT IT WASN’T JUST ENERGY POLICYMAKERS THEY WANTED TO BE CLOSE TO – THEY WANTED A PLACE THEY COULD SUCCESSFULLY GROW THE COMPANY.

 

NEIL KOEHLER, CEO

we are growing very rapidly , we have 75 employees today, 18 months from now, we expect to have 275 to 300 employees so we are planning to hire a lot of new people and the demographics of sacramento are very appealing. What we have in the depth and breadth of the workforce here in sacramento is also is very appealing to us plus it’s very important that people enjoy where they live and work and we believe this is a great place to live.

 

 

WHILE SACRAMENTO IS TRYING TO PROMOTE AN IDENTITY THAT ENCOMPASSES ALL THE TOWNS IN THE REGION — THERE ARE SOME STAND OUTS WHEN IT COMES TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT.

 

ROSEVILLE IS ONE OF THEM.

 

THE FACT THAT MANY OF THE REGION’S MOST SUCCESSFUL BUSINESSES ARE LOCATED HERE IS NO ACCIDENT.

Mike Zeigler, PRIDE Industries

 

I tell people you'd have to be a fool to not succeed in Roseville. It has been one of the fastest growing economic engines in America.

 

 

PRIDE INDUSTRIES HAS UNDERGONE PHENOMENAL GROWTH IN ROSEVILLE – AND IS JOINED BY OTHER HEAVY HITTERS LIKE HEWLETT PACKARD,

N-E-C, AND KAISER PERMANENTE TO NAME A FEW.

 

ROSEVILLE HAS TRIPLED THE NUMBER OF JOBS HERE OVER THE LAST TWENTY YEARS BY MAKING SURE THAT COMPANIES LIKE PRIDE STAY.

 

 

 

 

MIKE ZEIGLER

These guys wanted to make sure that we didn't leave and I even told them I wasn't leaving but they would have none of it.

JULIA BURROWS

Our City Manager actually, took Mike in the car. And they drove around Roseville. And Al said, “We really, really want you to stay in Roseville.”

 

MIKE ZEIGLER

they took me on a personal tour of Roseville to tell me what was gonna happen , all the different places they thought that PRIDE should locate.

 

IT’S NO SURPRISE THAT PRIDE BUILT ITS NEW 180-THOUSAND SQUARE FOOT HEADQUARTERS IN NORTH ROSEVILLE.

 

AND ITS NOT JUST THE LARGE COMPANIES THAT GET THIS SORT OF ATTENTION.

 

BOB WHITSON, Emulex

 

I have breakfast with the mayor (smiles)… know Julia Burrows who is a key member of the Roseville team to help nurture and create startups.

they’re really going out of their way to make sure we are comfortable.

 

 

…if there is anything the city can do to assist your businesses…

 

 

MANY BUSINESS LEADERS GET REGULAR FACE TO FACE MEETINGS WITH CITY MANAGERS, COUNCILORS, AND THE MAYOR.

 

 

 

…I’m working on transitioning and opening a satellite office in Roseville…

 

 

AND IT MAKES A DIFFERENCE.

 

 

by 2015, we will be the second largest employment center in the region, surpassing downtown Sacramento.

 

[Music]

 

 

THE VISION FOR BECOMING A REGIONAL BUSINESS CENTER WAS SET OUT BY ROSEVILLE CITY PLANNERS IN THE 1980’s.

 

IT STARTED WITH INFRASTRUCTURE – ROADS, WATER, ELECTRICITY.

 

NEXT CAME LAND USE PLANNING TO BALANCE COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL SPACES.

 

AND THEN THE AMENITIES SUCH AS PARKS, OPEN SPACES, AND GOOD SCHOOLS.

 

THE BUSINESSES FOLLOWED.

 

NOW THE CITY OF ROSEVILLE IS FOCUSING ON WHAT IT CALLS ITS “HUMAN CAPITAL.”

 

 

JULIA BURROWS

Our biggest priorities are the work force of the future.

 

IT MEANS MAKING SURE THEY ARE MATCHING EDUCATION PROGRAMS WITH BUSINESS NEEDS.

 

BUT IT ALSO MEANS MAKING SURE

ROSEVILLE’S YOUNG PEOPLE STICK AROUND.

 

AND JOBS ALONE WON’T DO THAT.

 

 

 

 

ROSEVILLE MAY BE A GREAT PLACE TO RAISE A FAMILY, BUT IT HOLDS LITTLE ATTRACTION FOR YOUNG PEOPLE JUST STARTING OUT IN THEIR CAREERS.

 

 

 

TANNER LAVERTY, ROSEVILLE CONNEC

young people move away for various reasons…

I’m one of those people actually. I moved away at 18 looking for something more exciting.

 

THE CITY OF ROSEVILLE KNOWS THAT AND HAS RECRUITED PEOPLE LIKE TANNER LAVERTY AND LIZ BEIDELMAN TO START A YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORK.

 

we’re going to have a presentation that starts in five minutes..

 

LIZ BEIDELMAN, ROSEVILLE CONNECTS

they really need to attract young talent- this whole 21 to 40 age group and grow that. So they realize that there needed to be some sort of organization in the community… that would make more people want to come move here and live here and spend their time here.

 

 

THEY NETWORK, THEY SOCIALIZE, AND THEY GIVE THE CITY AN EARFUL ON WHAT IT IS LACKING.

 

JULIA BURROWS

We’re hearing that we probably should have a bit more nightlife…

 

THEY ALSO WANT IT TO BE UNIQUE—SUBURBAN STRIP MALLS JUST WON’T DO.

SO ROSEVILLE IS INVESTING HEAVILY IN ITS HISTORIC DOWNTOWN. IT HAS ALREADY SPENT 30-MILLION DOLLARS TO MAKE IT MORE ATTRACTIVE TO NEW BUSINESSES LIKE RESTAURANTS AND NIGHTCLUBS – AND DEVELOPERS OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING SUCH AS LOFTS AND CONDOS.

 

TANNERY LAVERTY

if you shove them in, you know, suburbia where there’s cookie cutter retail and, you know, commercial spaces and a few restaurants, they’re not going to get that and they’re not going to feel that.

 

Liz BeidELman

Right. And a city that understands that and embraces that it’s like okay, we need to do something to make that happen, that’s the city that’s going to be successful.

 

[Music]

 

SACRAMENTO’S FUTURE GROWTH AND THE IDENTITY IT DEVELOPS WILL HAVE A LOT TO DO WITH THE KINDS OF BUSINESSES IT ATTRACTS – AND THE AMENITIES IT OFFERS …

 

IN THE NEXT NEW VALLEY, WE’LL TAKE A LOOK AT WHAT THE REGION IS DOING TO MAKE THIS AN ATTRACTIVE PLACE TO LIVE.

 

LIZ: You have access to the bay area, silicon valley … trips to Reno and and Lake Tahoe are only an hour away

 

 

 

 

Come to Sacramento, it’s not LA

 

Capital melting pot?

 

Hot Sacramento

 

 

Little cozy in-between

 

 

 

TANNER: i realize that is really great and all but it didn't really say much about Sacramento itself (laughing)

LIZ: it's like all these areas outside of sac are awesome

TANNER: yeah , yeah... so

LIZ: so let's live in the middle.

 

The good niche in between… (laughs)